John

Revisiting ALL THE PRESIDENT’S MEN (1976)

By John H. Foote (****) When Richard Nixon was re-elected President in 1972, he rode into office on the wave of the greatest landslide in American political history. Did he know just 18 months later, disgraced, he would resign the Presidency under the cloud of the Watergate affair? I think Nixon thought his substantial achievements in the Oval…

Revisiting A STREETCAR NAMED DESIRE (1951)

By John H. Foote (****) When Tennessee Williams wrote The Glass Menagerie, he drew heavily on his own life, his past and the result was the birth of the neo realistc American theatre. A Streetcar Named Desire would blow the lid off that movement and, together with Arthur Miller’s Death Of a Salesman, make the late forties the…

Review: ON THE BASIS OF SEX (*)

By John H. Foote This is the worst kind of Hollywood biography. To be merciful, I will be quick. Ruth Bader Ginsburg is one of the most extraordinary women on the last one hundred years and certainly deserved so much more than this. Earlier in the year, the superb documentary RBG (2018) beautifully documented the life of this…

Review: DESTROYER (***)

By John H. Foote Nicole Kidman gives a towering performance of barely concealed fury in this film, a performance that elevates the film, a performance that is the finest of her career. With little to no make up, her hair a mess, her eyes red with lack of sleep, her movements simply forward, unyielding, she is a frightening…

Review: VICE (****)

By John H. Foote Great acting performances leave me in awe. They stroke my soul, they feed me. Great acting has often brought me to tears just because of the purity of the accomplishment, it can be utterly breathtaking to see. From Marlon Brando and Vivien Leigh in A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), Jane Fonda in Klute (1971),…